Warm Mineral Springs Midcentury Modern Buildings Will Be Saved

By Jifat Windmiller, RA
Penta Windmiller Architecture, PC

The following is a story with a very happy ending.

After 7 years of beating the drum that the 3 small mid-century modern buildings at Warm Mineral Springs in the City of North Port Florida are significant and worthy of preservation, after speaking to Mayors and Commissioners and residents and many others about this subject over and over even when they thought I was out of my mind because they couldn’t understand what I was talking about, after relentlessly holding the vision that these charming buildings could and should be preserved and restored, yesterday was the culmination of this massive effort.

I am thrilled to report and announce that there was a unanimous vote to save and preserve all 3 of the mid-century modern buildings at Warm Mineral Springs in North Port, including a uniquely charming Cyclorama which contains a 3-D multimedia exhibition of Ponce de Leon “discovering” the Springs and designating it as the “Original fountain of youth.”

Cyclorama Warm Mineral Springs FL

Above: Cyclorama building designed by architect Jack West in 1959
Photo © Jifat Windmiller

Further there was a unanimous vote to submit an application to place these buildings on the National Register of Historical Places.

When I first began speaking to anyone that would listen about these buildings, well, no one would listen.  When Docomomo announced that it was holding its 2013 conference in Sarasota, I made a submission to them and got accepted as a presenter at that conference.  It was the first time anyone had heard of the existence of these buildings let alone that they had any merit or significance!  It was no wonder, in their current state of disrepair you’d need some serious rose colored glasses to be able to see what I saw when I looked at them.  And in the case of the Cyclorama, it had been abandoned, padlocked shut and ignored for roughly 15 years.

The presentation at the Docomomo conference was very well received and subsequently written about in the Sarasota Herald Tribune, along with various websites and blogs.  This was followed by the Sarasota Architectural Foundation inviting me to give their membership a presentation about the buildings at Warm Mineral Springs.  We were fortunate enough then to be permitted to arrange a bus tour to see the structures even though Warm Mineral Springs was closed at the time.

The area was going through multiple changes in ownership and political deliberations about how the it should be managed.  The springs, the park within which it is situated, and the buildings that I speak of had during this time changed hands from being privately held and managed, to being purchased jointly by the County of Sarasota and the City of North Port, and then due to political differences it was subsequently purchased by the City of North Port, who has been its sole steward in recent years.  Throughout this turmoil the buildings were never recognized as having any value, it was the always the waters and the park that were at center stage of all the discussions.

And during all this I have had conversations and letters with every Mayor, Vice-Mayor, and Commissioner of the City of North Port (previous to that also with the County of Sarasota and previous to that with the private owners and manager of WMS), and have educated them as to why it would be to their benefit to save and restore these buildings.  It was quite the uphill battle!  They all thought I was out of my mind.  However I kept on stressing why it would be in their best interests to keep and restore these buildings.  I spoke about it in terms that I hoped they would be able to understand and get excited about.  After years of this they eventually hired outside consultants who educated themselves on the history and heritage of the buildings, assessed their conditions, were in dialogue with Washington DC to inquire about the likelihood of having the buildings placed on the National Register of Historic Places, and altogether verified what I have been stating all along.

This past week I have once again been in touch with the voting members and many many other concerned citizens of North Port who showed up to the meeting and expressed their desires to preserve the buildings.  I am so incredibly thrilled to share with you that a vote at a meeting that lasted for 7 hours and went late into the evening led to a unanimous vote, 5 to 0, to preserve and renovate ALL THREE BUILDINGS DUE TO THEIR HISTORICAL SIGNIFICANCE!!

This is the best news possible, and so much better because the vote was made unanimously!

Just one year ago, when there were 4 voting members, the same subject had come up for a vote and it was dismissed as a tie, 2 for and 2 against, and it had to be tabled.  Even then they were only discussing potentially preserving the Cyclorama, and maybe possibly 1 of the other 2 structures.  The 2 members who had voted against this last year were 2 of the 5 members who voted again yesterday and were among the ones who unanimously voted to preserve and renovate not just the Cyclorama, but all 3 structures.  This is the most significant aspect of this vote because it shows that there is now an understanding of the significance of these buildings even by those who were previously quick to dismiss and discard the buildings.  The journey that has taken them to this understanding has been a long road but I am so proud of them for being able to learn about an unfamiliar subject and finally embrace what is in their own backyard.

One of many letters sent to me yesterday stated, “YIPPEE it’s time to celebrate!!”  I write to each of you as interested parties to join us now in this celebration!!!  And, from here I look forward to a future date when the buildings have been restored, accepted by Washington DC to be on their Register of Historic Places, and a visit to WMS and the Cyclorama gets put on the map as an excursion for mid-century modern architecture admirers everywhere!

Warmest happy wishes,
Jifat Windmiller, RA
Penta Windmiller Architecture, PC
212 447 0047
jw@pentawind.com

PS  –  I am quite certain that being so close by to Sarasota and that the Sarasota Architectural Foundation exists to inform and celebrate the mid-century modern architecture of the area was a significant aspect leading them to being able to embrace the idea that these buildings were worth keeping and to this historic vote!

 

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Bayfront MOD

Sarasota is filled with amazing modern architecture. A recent morning walk along the bayfront was spent looking up and admiring the varied, angular roof lines.

SAF Twitter_Bayfront walk_9-30-17

Top left to right
Van Wezel Concert Hall
, 1970, William Wesley Peters, Taliesin Architects
GWiz, 1976, Skidmore & Merrill and Jack West; restoration 2000, Dale Parks, CCP Architects
Beau Ciel Condominium, 2003, Curtis Gaines Hall Jones Architects

The Van Wezel and GWiz buildings are under threat as the future of Sarasota’s bayfront is reimagined by the community-based Sarasota Bayfront Planning Organization.

The Sarasota Bayfront Planning Organization (SBPO) was formed in 2016, building on work completed by the Sarasota Bayfront 20:20 organization to advance the development of City-owned land along the Sarasota Bayfront. This private-public partnership with the City of Sarasota is headed by a nine-person board: chairman A.G. Lafley, treasurer Cathy Layton, secretary Jennifer Compton, Tom Barwin, Al Carlson, Keith Dubose, Michael Klauber, Rob Lane and Cynthia McCague. The SBPO is tasked with ensuring the delivery of a professionally prepared master plan for the sustainable development of the 42-acre Sarasota Bayfront in accordance with the Guiding Principles established by the community and the City of Sarasota Commission. The SBPO will oversee the development of an operating structure that will professionally manage the Sarasota Bayfront Project during and following construction.

Six stakeholder representatives serve, along with board member Michael Klauber, on the Steering Committee as an independent organization:

Neighborhood Associations
Bob Pirollo – Downtown Sarasota Condo Association
Steven Roskamp – North Trail Redevelopment Partnership

Cultural and Educational Organizations
Jim Shirley – Arts and Cultural Alliance of Sarasota County
Dr. Larry R. Thompson – Ringling College of Arts and Design

Civic Groups
Kevin Cooper – Greater Sarasota Chamber of Commerce
Bill Seider – The Community Foundation of Sarasota County

Master plan proposals were submitted from 22 teams and 4 teams were selected for final interviews on October 3 – 4, 2017. The winning prime consultant will be selected on October 11, 2017.

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MOD 2017 Tickets on Sale

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Architect Max Strang interprets ‘old-school’ ideas for a new era

By Harold Bubil, real estate editor, Herald-Tribune

Max Strang, a Winter Haven native who made his architectural reputation in Miami,

Max Strang

Max Strang, FAIA, Photo ©Scott Rhea

turned some heads when he returned to his Polk County hometown to design an elegantly bold, contemporary downtown apartment building called Raingarden Lofts.

The town is known for the progressive modernism of architect Gene Leedy. But still, the lofts, completed in 2015, stand out. Winter Haven is not Miami.

The façade of the building evokes Paul Rudolph‘s 1958 Deering House on Casey Key. That is not by chance. In 1980, when he was 10, Strang’s parents bought a rundown house on Casey Key next to Leedy’s restored beach house, which was a few houses up the beach from the temple-like Deering House. Although now largely hidden from street view by a new house on the site, it has become an icon of the Sarasota School of architecture.

“My father purchased a decrepit old shack next door to a house Leedy had renovated for his own use,” said Strang, whose firm is known as [STRANG], complete with the brackets. “I used to go shelling there all the time.”

He also used to visit the Leedy-designed Syd Solomon House on the south end of Siesta. No longer standing because of beach erosion, it was “a powerful space, too,” Strang recalls.

These childhood experiences shaped the architect’s outlook. And he firmly believes Florida’s midcentury modern architecture still has plenty to teach the designers and clients of today.

Max Strang horizontal_600px
The Sarasota Architectural Foundation presented a lecture by Strang, titled “The Evolution of Florida Modernism,” on Wednesday in the Alfred Goldstein Library at Ringling College of Art + Design.

“A good Sarasota School of Architecture house blurs the indoor-outdoor (divide) so well – the walls of glass, the light coming in from different directions,” Strang said Monday in a telephone interview. “For me, it is a sense of peace when you are inside one of those homes.”

He should know. His childhood house in Winter Haven was designed by Leedy, who got his start in Sarasota in the early 1950s before heading to Polk County.

After graduating from the University of Florida, Strang worked for Leedy as an intern. “He sent me to Tampa as free labor for John Howey, doing drawings” for Howey’s 1995 book, “The Sarasota School of Architecture.” He later worked in the firm of the late Pritzker Prize-winner Zaha Hadid. His firm has offices in Miami, Fort Lauderdale and Telluride, Colorado, where he lives.

Strang cropped

Raingarden Lofts, [STRANG] Architects, Winter Haven, Florida – Photo ©Claudio Manzoni


For the Raingarden Lofts (shown above) and the under-construction Tuckman House (shown below) in Fort Lauderdale, Strang and his bright young staff took some clues from Paul Rudolph in considering the site and climate. Both structures have vertical exterior “fins” that help control sunlight, without blocking it. Rudolph showed how this could be done at the Deering House (its beefy beachside columns cast shadows on the interior), Sarasota High School, the Umbrella House , the Milam House on Ponte Vedra Beach and other structures that sought to tame the sun without blocking it completely.

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Tuckman Residence, [STRANG] Architects, Ft Lauderdale, Florida, 2017

“The fins on the second floor, those are in response to climate and privacy in the same way Rudolph’s Milam House did with the staggered squares and the sunshades,” Strang said of the Tuckman House. “The architecture is performing a role to address the climate. The style just comes with it.”

Strang is often approached by clients who want the delicacy of the midcentury modern houses, but the luxury and size of today.

“All the time, I get a new commission to do a house, and the client will bring me reference images of Sarasota School houses, or (1940s) Case Study houses in Los Angeles, yet they are asking for an 8,000-square-foot house,” he said with a laugh. “I think there is a nostalgia for the smaller scale of these things,” a scale that is hard to achieve when flood-zone requirements mandate the elevation of waterfront homes.

“And, there are the strict product approvals in South Florida,” Strang said. “It is hard to get the sizes of the windows that we would prefer. The Florida Energy Code says you can only have so much glass in the house, too. So it is a struggle to match the delicacy and transparency of those early buildings.”

But, the ideas of Rudolph, Leedy, Tim Seibert, Victor Lundy and others endure, and can be reused, if not reproduced, he said. Those ideas include clarity of design concept, the honest and innovative use of materials, using structure to define space and not compete with it, and blending indoors with outdoors.

“It is the repurposing of the ideas, not repurposing the exact iteration of the building,” Strang said. “It underscores the timelessness of the Sarasota School. The modern movement probably got overtaken by schlocky modern buildings too quickly, and the good stuff wasn’t appreciated. Its time ended prematurely. So I am happy to help share the ongoing relevance of midcentury modernism.

“There can be very schlocky modern architecture, too. When someone does a traditional building poorly, it is not as bad as when someone does a modern building poorly.” SAF

SarasotaMOD’s Round House Party and Tour November 6th

RoundHouse

November 6, 2015
7 to 10 pm
$100

Eventbrite - Round House Cocktail Party and House Tour

The Round House, also known as the Hilton Leech Art Studio, was designed in 1960 by Sarasota School architect Jack West. The 18-foot tall circular house has overhead glass panels providing natural light to the downstairs spaces where watercolorist Leech once held classes.

Join us for a tour of the stunning renovation and enjoy an open bar, cocktails and bountiful hors d’oeuvres for a memorable MCM evening.

Catering by Innovative Dining, Jeremy Chambers and Danny Gibbons
Illustration by John PirmanSarasotaMOD Weekend November 6 - 9, 2015

November 6 – 9, 2015, Sarasota, Florida

Celebrating Paul Rudolph
Tours, Presentations, Parties
Walker Guest House Replica Opening
SarasotaMOD.com